Key Stage 4 Overview - History

Key Stage 4 History 2018-2023 (current Y9)

Overview:

Intent

We believe that students deserve a broad and ambitious History curriculum, rich in skills and knowledge, which immerses students in a range of cultures and engenders an enquiring and critical outlook on the world. Our History curriculum will give students the opportunity to:

  • study issues at a local, national and international level in Ancient, Medieval, Early Modern and Modern time periods
  • understand Britain’s influence on the wider world
  • study the history and influence of different peoples and places across time
  • assess the impact of events on individual and communities
  • be exposed to a high level of historical and conceptual vocabulary
  • learn to interpret a broad range of sources including visual sources and propaganda
  • be exposed to different peoples’ perspectives on issues and events
  • develop an understanding of how to apply and write about historical concepts such as causation; continuity and change; significance; consequence; diversity
  • challenge received wisdom about historical figures and issues
  • develop confidence in orating and debating historical issues and evaluate historical interpretations

Pedagogy

Enrichment

Sequencing

Key Concepts/Skills

Our pedagogy is underpinned by:

·         enquiry based studies set within a broader historical context

·         a focus on developing students’ analytical writing by focussing on description, explanation and evaluation

·         the regular use of live modelling and exemplar answers to demonstrate processes, standards and expectations

·         a range of strategies to deepen knowledge so that it is committed to long term memory

·         the importance of giving students regular opportunities to improve work

·         interrogating current historical debates

·         students understanding what they are doing well and how they need to improve

·         students will develop new skills through a variety of interesting contexts to foster enjoyment

·         students will develop a rich and deep subject knowledge

We will enrich our curriculum by:

·         establishing cross-curricular links

·         providing on and off-site subject or topic related experiences

·         offering opportunities for children to learn outdoors where appropriate

·         holding Trust-wide competitions to celebrate best work and extraordinary effort

·         encouraging students to contribute to the life of the school and the community, including remembrance activities

·         developing partnerships with external providers that extend children’s opportunities for learning

·         build on their understanding of the importance of British values, including democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and tolerance and respect

·         improve their spiritual, social, moral and cultural understanding

Students learn within a coherent chronological framework because…

·         it allows key concepts and themes such as civilisation, society, government to be interwoven and promotes the ability to see the evolution of concepts

·         it provides the opportunity to measure pace, extent and trends in change and continuity over time

·         it means that students are able to make relevant links between historical episodes such as the black death and the industrial revolution

·         there is progression between key stages 2, 3 and 4, with students being exposed to themes and content that will allow all students to access KS4

·         there is an increasing level of challenge and complexity to enquiries

·         there is appropriate division of time between Ancient, Medieval, Early Modern and Modern topics

·         students will develop a narrative of British history which is supported by theories of cognitive load

 

In History, students will develop a strong understanding of the meanings of key concepts, in different historical and geographical contexts:

·         Democracy.

·         Civilisation.

·         Empire.

·         Monarchy.

·         Parliament.

·         Government.

·         Peasantry.

·         Society.

·         Culture.

·         Economy.

·         Religion.

·         State.

·         Health.

·         Justice.

·         Beliefs.

·         Power.

They will do so by developing skills in the following areas:

·         Significance; Interpretations; Perspectives; Causation; Consequence; Diversity; Change and continuity; Chronology; Source Analysis; Source Evaluation.

History in our academies will provide students with the ability to think critically about the world in which they live and to question, rather than accept ‘received wisdom’. The History curriculum is sequenced chronologically to ensure students develop a narrative of British history and can place it into a context of world events. Concepts such as ‘government’ and ‘peasantry’ are introduced early to allow students to track the development of these ideas and define them within different contexts and cultures. For example, peasantry is introduced in year 7 as part of the study of the Black Death and revisited in a different context during the French Revolution. This ensures students will see that historical terms evolve and adapt to context.

The curriculum has been designed to ensure that students gain an appreciation of divergent perspectives, rather than sticking to established historical norms. For example, in studying the Second World War, students are challenged to see the impact of the war on other countries that were attached to Britain through the Empire. They then seek to question the motives of Churchill’s decisions to divert resources to Britain and the impact that had on Bengal. Furthermore, we introduce students to characters and groups who have traditionally been ignored such as LGBT+ and Native Americans. This ensures that students receive a rounded education in History and is essential in teaching attitudes of tolerance. In History lessons, students will regularly apply new knowledge to conceptual questions. Each topic is framed around a challenging historical question which is linked to a second order concept. Lessons mirror this, with key questions forming the basis for each lesson enquiry. This will ensure students access and apply high level vocabulary with increasing rigour over their time in history classrooms. With plenty of opportunities to perform extended writing, we are confident that history in Delta Academies is a highly rigorous and incredibly purposeful part of our curriculum.

 

Year 7

7.1

7.2

7.3

7.4

7.5

7.6

How successful were the Ancients?

How successful was the Norman Conquest of England?

What did people believe about the Black Death?

How significant was the English Reformation?

How was Britain able to create the biggest Empire the world has ever seen?

What was the impact of slavery on Africa?

Knowledge

 

Key content i.e. SEND curriculum

Ancient Greek culture, society, democracy, warfare, myth and philosophy; Ancient Greek approaches to health and medicine; causes of the Roman invasion of Britain; impact of Roman rule of Britain on – society, culture, beliefs, economy, justice and the built environment; Roman beliefs about and approaches to health and medicine.

A local study of the impact of Roman Britain.

Decline of the Roman Empire; society, culture and justice in Anglo-Saxon England; reasons for Viking invasions of England; strengths and weaknesses of England under Alfred the Great; succession crisis of and battles of 1066; reasons for William’s victory at Hastings; rebellions against William, 1068-69; reasons for and impact of the Harrying of the North, 1069; impact of the Norman Conquest on society, culture, religion and the built environment as well as aspects of continuity.

A local study linked to any aspect.

Life in towns and villages in medieval England e.g. health, hobbies, work.

The importance of the Christian church to the lives of people in Medieval England;

the spread of Islam and Islamic civilisation in the middle age; beliefs about the causes of illness in Britain e.g. natural, supernatural; spreading of the Black Death and responses to it; impact and significance of the Black Death including the revolt of 1381.

The power of the monarchy by 1509; power and influence of the Catholic Church; growth of the Protestant Church; causes of the English Reformation; causes of the dissolution of the monasteries; changing nature of religion under Edward VI, Mary I and Elizabeth I; long-term impact of the Reformation

A local study linked to a monastery/abbey

Reasons for the growth of the British Empire in C18th including warfare; colonisation of India – causes and consequence; reasons for the Opium Wars with China; interpretations of the British Empire’s impact/significance.

Civilisation in Africa before the Transatlantic Slave Trade; the impact of the slave trade on Africa; conditions and treatment of slaves on the middle passage and plantations; the life of Olaudah Equiano; the causes of abolition of TST in the British Empire

A local estate/family linked to slave ownership or abolition.

Skills/Concepts

Causation; Consequence; Change and Continuity; Chronology; Source Analysis.

Democracy; Civilisation; Empire; Society; Culture; Health; Justice; Beliefs.

Significance; Causation; Consequence; Diversity; Change and continuity; Source Analysis.

Democracy; Monarchy; Government; Peasantry; Society; Culture; Economy; Religion; Health; Justice; Power.

Significance; Perspectives; Causation; Consequence; Diversity; Change and continuity.

Monarchy; Peasantry; Society; Culture; Economy; Religion; State; Health; Justice; Beliefs; Power.

Significance; Interpretations; Perspectives; Causation; Consequence; Diversity; Change and continuity; Source Analysis.

Democracy; Monarchy; Parliament; Government; Peasantry; Society; Culture; Economy; Religion; State; Justice; Beliefs; Power.

Significance; Interpretations; Perspectives; Causation; Consequence; Diversity; Source Analysis; Source Evaluation.

 

Democracy; Civilisation; Empire; Society; Culture; Economy; Religion; State; Justice; Beliefs.

 

Significance; Perspectives; Consequence; Diversity; Change and continuity.

Civilisation; Empire; Society; Culture; Economy; Religion; State; Beliefs; Power.

 

 

SMSC – British values

Democracy and the rule of law.

Democracy and the rule of law.

Tolerance.

Tolerance.

Mutual respect and tolerance.

Mutual respect and tolerance.

Literacy focus

Applying a high level of accurate historical detail to pieces of extended writing.

Using categories to organise descriptive writing e.g. society; culture.

Using connectives and phrases that develop explanations.

Organising explanations around categories/factors.

Writing with clarity.

Using specialist terminology e.g. abolition and developing language used to explain.

Assessment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Big Write 1: ‘The Ancient Greeks were a very successful civilisation.’ How far do you agree? Explain your answer.

 

 

Big Write 2: ‘The Britons’ lives were improved by Roman Rule.’   How far do you agree?

Big Write: ‘The Vikings were just fearsome warriors.’ How far do you agree?

 

 

Big Write 1: ‘The church was the most important part of medieval peoples’ way of life.’ How far do you agree?

 

 

Big Write 2: ‘The Black Death had a significant impact on the medieval way of life.’ How far do you agree?

Big Write 1: Explain why Kirkstall Abbey was ruined in 1539.

 

 

Big Write 2: Explain why there was opposition to the English Reformation.

 

 

 

Big Write: ‘The British mainly relied on warfare to grow its Empire.’ How far do you agree? Explain your answer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Big Write 1: ‘The main result of the TST was the dehumanising of slaves.’ How far do you agree?

 

July exams

 

 

 

 

 

Year 8

8.1

8.2

8.3

8.4

8.5

8.6

Did everyone benefit from the Industrial Revolution?

How violent was the French Revolution?

How well did the Natives adapt to the Plains?

Online learning

Why did so many people die for the vote?

Attitudes towards women during C19th including the influence of Queen Victoria; rise of the suffrage movement amongst the working classes; rise of the female suffrage movement; methods of the suffragist and suffragette campaigns; interpretations of the Suffragette campaign; role of women during the First World War; reasons for women gaining limited suffrage in 1918.

 

Did everyone benefit from the boom? (1920s USA)

Isolationism/impact of FWW, causes of boom, impact on different groups, prohibition, ending of the boom, causes of the crash.

Knowledge

 

Key content i.e. SEND curriculum

Changing nature of life in England between 1750 and 1900; reasons for industrialisation of Britain; impact of industrialisation on society e.g. children; changing nature of medical understanding; developments in surgery during C19th e.g. anaesthetics and antiseptics.

A local study of the impact of industrialisation or the agricultural revolution.

Causes of the Revolution including absolutism; character of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette; significance of the Tennis Court Oath; trial and execution of Louis including the reasons for his execution; Robespierre and the Terror; impact of the Revolution – Napoleon.

Geography and environment of the American West; beliefs and culture of the Native American tribes; importance of the buffalo; beliefs and methods of warfare; case study of the Sioux Nation; the myth of Native Americans (representations through popular media e.g. video games, film).

Skills/Concepts

Significance; Perspectives; Causation; Consequence; Diversity; Change and continuity; Chronology; Source Analysis; Source Evaluation.

Democracy; Empire; Parliament; Government; Peasantry; Society; Culture; Economy; State; Health; Justice.

 

 

Significance; Perspectives; Causation; Consequence; Change and continuity; Source Analysis.

 

Democracy; Monarchy; Government; Peasantry; Society; Culture; Economy; Religion; State; Justice; Beliefs; Power.

 

Perspectives; Consequence; Diversity; Change and continuity; Chronology; Source Analysis; Source Evaluation.

Civilisation; Empire; Society; Culture; Economy; Health; Justice; Beliefs.

 

SMSC – British Values

Democracy and mutual respect.

Democracy and the rule of law.

Mutual respect and tolerance.

Literacy focus

Distinguishing between language to explain causes and consequences.

Using challenging and unfamiliar language i.e. French terms such as Ancien Regime.

Using unusual terminology accurately. Developing language to assess importance.

Assessment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Big Write 1: Explain why Britain was industrialised from 1750 to 1900.

 

 

Big Write 2: ‘Ordinary people’s lives became worse as a result of industrialisation between 1750 and 1900.’ How far do you agree?

 

 

Big Write 1: ‘The French had no choice but to execute Louis XVI.’ How far do agree?

 

Big Write 2: ‘Very little changed in France as a result of the French Revolution.’ How far do you agree?

Big Write: Explain why the buffalo was so important to the Native Americans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year 9

9.1

9.2

9.3

9.4

9.5

9.6

How significant was the First World War?

How much control did the Nazis have over the people of Germany?

What were the major turning points of the Second World War?

To what extent do we live in a multicultural Britain?

How significant was Martin Luther King jnr for the development of black Civil Rights?

Cold War and Vietnam

Knowledge

 

Key content i.e. SEND curriculum

Changes in the nature of warfare during the FWW; reasons for the war of attrition; trench environment and impact upon soldiers including shell shock; reasons for the high level of casualties at the Battle of the Somme; social impact of the war e.g. on work, housing and attitudes; involvement and significance of soldiers from the Empire; aftermath of the war e.g. destruction, political chaos, Treaty of Versailles

A local study of involvement in the First World War

Life for Jews living in Germany and occupied Europe in the 1930s and 40s; causes and significance of Kristallnacht; increase in aggression towards Jews culminating in the ‘Final Solution’; treatment of prisoners in concentration camps including Jews, homosexuals, asocials and gypsies; resistance to the persecution of Jews in Germany and occupied Europe; impact of the holocaust (shoah) upon Jewish communities including migration to Israel

The reasons for the rise of Nazism in Germany; the development of tension in Europe in the 1930s – reasons for appeasement and the escalation of militarism in Nazi foreign policy; British preparations for the war including evacuation, rationing, women’s land army; significance of major events in the war including Dunkirk, the Battle of Britain, the Battle of the Atlantic, Stalingrad, D-Day; role and significance of Alan Turing’s Enigma Machine

A local link to the Second World War.

 

The impact of the ending of slavery including segregation; ‘Black Renaissance’ in the 1920s; significance of the murder of Emmett Till; methods of the Civil Rights movement including bus boycotts and the march on Washington;  role and significance of Martin Luther King Jnr; reasons for improvements in Black Civil Rights between 1964 and 1968

 

Skills/Concepts

Significance; Causation; Consequence; Diversity; Change and continuity; Chronology.

Democracy; Empire; Monarchy; Government; Society; Economy; State; Health.

 

Interpretations; Consequence; Diversity; Change and continuity; Source Analysis; Source Evaluation.

Democracy; Government; Society; Culture; Economy; Religion; State; Justice; Beliefs; Power.

 

 

Significance; Interpretations; Perspectives; Consequence; Diversity.

Empire; Society; Culture; Economy; State; Health.

 

 

Significance; Interpretations; Perspectives; Causation; Consequence; Diversity; Change and continuity; Source Analysis; Source Evaluation.

Democracy; Civilisation; Government; Society; Culture; Economy; Religion; Justice; Beliefs; Power.

 

SMSC – British values

Individual liberty and mutual respect.

Individual liberty and democracy.

Individual liberty and tolerance.

Individual liberty and tolerance.

Individual liberty and tolerance.

 

Literacy focus

Writing to express the extent of change.

Evaluating the language used in sources.

Organising ideas around criteria.

 

Using specialist terms to assess significance.

 

Links to prior learning

Students need to reflect on the methods of warfare they have previously studied, such as civil war and in Britain’s empire building to provide insight into the changes that took place in the FWW.

A number of topics have examined the development of control over a population such as the Norman Conquest and British Empire topics. This topic will demonstrate some of the similarities in approaches taken to control a populace.

Strong links to the First World War topic and this builds on the rising tensions between European and world powers as studied when looking at the impact of the FWW and rise of Nazism.

 

This topic develops ideas of protest as studied during the suffrage topic as well as picking up the narrative of treatment of black people in America from the end of slavery.

 

Preparation for future learning

10.3 provides understanding of the changes in warfare that affected the developments in treatments on WF.

11.3; 11.4 impact of Nazi policies on the population of Germany including persecution of Jews and undesirables.

10.2 provides context for progress in medicine during the SWW e.g. students will look at the development of penicillin in 10.2

 

11.3; 11.4 comparison of persecution of black people with that of Jews/undesirables in Nazi Germany, also context for attitudes during 1936 Olympics towards Jesse Owens.

 

Assessment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Big Write 1: Explain why the British Army suffered heavy casualties during the Battle of the Somme.

 

Big Write 2: Explain why British society experienced major change as a result of the First World War.

Big Write 1: Write a narrative account analysing the persecution of minorities under Nazi rule 1933-1945.

 

Big Write 2: Explain why there was little opposition to the Nazi regime in Germany.

December exams

Big Write 1: ‘The evacuation of Dunkirk was a total disaster for the allies.’ How far do you agree?

 

Big Write 2: ‘The German failure at Stalingrad was the major turning point of the Second World War.’ How far do you agree?

 

Big Write: ‘Treatment of African-Americans changed very little between 1865 and 1955.’  How far do you agree?

 

 

July exams

 

 

Year 10

10.1

10.2

10.3

10.4

10.5

10.6

To what extent did the church hold back medical progress between c. 1250 and 1700?

How important was technology for revolutionising medicine and health between c.1700 and the present day?

How successful were attempts to treat British soldiers on the Western Front?

To what extent did William annihilate old England?

How much did William rely on brutal methods to gain control of England?

How and why did the US government encourage the settlement of the West?

Knowledge

Ancient ideas of Hippocrates and Galen

The role of the Church

Ideas on the Cause of Disease: Miasmata, Four Humours Theory, Theory of Opposites, Astrology, Religion

Case Study: The Black Death, 1348-49

Developments in the Renaissance Period

The role of Individuals: Harvey, Vesalius, Sydenham

Change in Attitudes: Printing Press, Royal Society

Care and Treatment in the Renaissance: Hospitals, Bloodletting, Purging

Case Study: The Great Plague, 1665

Changing Ideas on the Cause of Disease: Germ Theory

Prevention of Disease: Vaccination, Government Action

Case Study: Cholera

Care and Treatment: Nightingale, Simpson, Lister, Aseptic Surgery

Modern Ideas on the Cause of Disease: DNA, Human Genome Project, Lifestyle Choices

The role of Government: NHS, Smoking, Diet, Alcohol

New Treatments: Magic Bullets, Penicillin

Technology: X-Rays, MRI Scans, CT Scans, Laparoscopic Surgery, Robotic Surgery

Case Study: Lung Cancer

Link developments to a local town e.g. 1875 Public Health Act.

Trench System

Key Battles in WWI: Somme, Ypres, Arras, Cambrai

The Chain of Evacuation for injured soldiers

New Techniques in Treatment: Wound excision, The Thomas Splint, Mobile X-Ray units, Blood Transfusions, Brain Surgery, Plastic Surgery

A study of the historic environment.

Anglo-Saxon society -  monarchy and government; Earldoms, local government and the legal system; economy and social system; towns and villages; influence

of the Church.

Power of the Godwins; Harold’s embassy to Normandy; rising against Tostig and his exile; death of Edward.

Rivals for the throne – their motives and claims; coronation of Harold Godwinson; Battles of Fulfordgate, Stamford Bridge and Hastings.

Reasons for William’s victory at Hastings.

Submission of the Earls, rebellions, 1068-75.

Normanisation of society, politics, economy, religion and monarchy.

Link an aspect to a local area/feature.

Harrying of the north; changes in landownership; methods of maintaining royal power; feudalism; tenants-in-chief; changes to the church; Lanfranc’s role and reforms; role of regents; sheriffs; forest laws; Domesday book; Norman aristrocracy; career and significance of Bishop Odo; William’s family; Robert’s revolt; William’s death and disputed succession.

Local link – impact of the Harrying of the north or local lords.

Way of Life of Plains Indians: Tribes and Society, Indian Appropriations Act, Buffalo

Early Migration: The Oregon Trail, Manifest Destiny, Gold Rush, Fort Laramie Treaty

Case Studies: The Donner Party, Mormons

Continued Migration: Pacific Railroad Act, Homestead Act

Growth of Settlement: Exoduster Movement, Oklahoma Land Rush

Farming: Homesteaders, problems for farmers, Civil War, Growth of the Cattle Industry

If possible – a local group who migrated to America.

Skills/Concepts

Significance; Causation; Consequence; Change and continuity; Chronology

Civilisation; Monarchy; Government; Peasantry; Society; Religion; State; Health; Beliefs; Power.

Significance; Causation; Consequence; Change and continuity; Chronology

Civilisation; Monarchy; Parliament; Government; Society; Culture; Economy; Religion; State; Health; Beliefs.

Perspectives; Change and continuity; Chronology; Source Analysis; Source Evaluation.

Democracy; Empire; Government; Society; Economy; State; Health; Beliefs.

Significance; Perspectives; Interpretations; Causation; Consequence; Diversity; Chronology.

Monarchy; Government; Peasantry; Society; Culture; Economy; Religion; Health; Justice.

Significance; Perspectives; Causation; Consequence; Diversity; Chronology; Source Analysis.

Democracy; Monarchy; Government; Peasantry; Society; Culture; Economy; Religion; Justice; Beliefs; Power.

Significance; Perspectives; Causation; Consequence; Diversity; Change and continuity; Chronology; Source Analysis.

Civilisation; Empire; Government; Society; Culture; Economy; Religion; Beliefs.

SMSC

Mutual respect and tolerance.

Mutual respect and tolerance.

Individual liberty and democracy.

Rule of law and individual liberty.

Rule of law and individual liberty.

Mutual respect and tolerance.

Literacy focus

Writing a balanced argument.

Explaining using factors to organise writing.

Writing to analyse and evaluate sources; reading challenging sources.

Writing a nuanced conclusion.

Writing to assess the extent of change.

Explaining and assessing the importance of consequences.

Links to prior learning

Ideas of Ancient Empires and their significance.

Life in Medieval England and responses to the Black Death

Industrialisation and the impact on people’s health

Key events of World War One from Y9.

Aspects of Anglo-Saxon and Norman England were studied in Y7 including the major battles of 1066 and Normanisation.

Aspects of Anglo-Saxon and Norman England were studied in Y7 including the major battles of 1066 and Normanisation.

The way of life of Plains Indians and their fundamental beliefs about society and nature

Preparation for future learning

10.4, 10.5 understanding the overarching themes of power in the medieval period i.e. importance of the church and role of monarchs.

10.3 developments in medicine up to 1914.

11.2, 11.3 provides understanding of the nature and impact of the FWW.

10.5 understanding the process by which the Normans won the throne and changed England informs understanding of the need to then control it.

11.3 comparisons can be made between the methods used by the Normans to control England and those by the Nazis in Germany.

11.1 understanding the settlement of the American West explains the reasons for growing tension between settlers and Natives.

Assessment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Explain why there was limited progress in the treatment of disease in the period c1250-c1500. (12)

 

 

Explain one way in which treatment of disease was similar in the period c1250-c1500 to treatment of disease in the period c1500-c1700. (4)

 

 

‘Ideas on the cause of disease made little progress during the period c1250-c1700’.  How far do you agree? (4)

‘There was limited progress in understanding the cause of disease in the period c1250-c1700’.  How far do you agree? (16)

 

Explain why there was progress in the treatment of disease in the period c1900-present. (12)

Paper One Section A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Describe two features of the Battle of Hastings. (4)

 

‘The main effect of Normanisation of England was to increase the power of the monarchy.’ How far do you agree? Explain your answer. (16)

 

Explain why medical understanding improved in the period c1500-c1700. (12)

 

Explain why Lanfranc reformed the church in England following the Norman Conquest. (12)

 

Write a narrative account analyzing the increase in westward migration in the period 1840-51. (8)

 

Explain the importance of the Goodnight-Loving Trail for the growth in cattle industry. (8)

 

Mock exams

Year 11

11.1

11.2

11.3

11.4

11.5

11.6

How did conflict escalate on the Great Plains?

Why did the Weimar Republic fail to last beyond 1933?

How was Hitler able to take complete control of Germany?

How did life change for people in Nazi Germany, 1933-39?

Revision

 

Knowledge

Conflict: Little Crow’s War, The Sand Creek Massacre, Red Cloud’s War, President Grant’s Peace Policy

The Great Sioux War: Black Hills, Little Bighorn, Wounded Knee

Lawlessness: Gold Rush, Law Officers, Outlaws, Ok Corral, Johnson and Lincoln County Wars

Extermination of the Buffalo

 

Early Challenges to the Weimar Republic 1918-23: German Revolution, Weimar Constitution, the Treaty of Versailles, Dolchstoss, Political extremists, Ruhr Crisis, Hyperinflation

Weimar Recovery 1924-29: Stresemann, Dawes Plan, Young Plan, Rentenmark, Locarno Pact, Kellogg-Briand Pact, League of Nations

Hitler’s Rise to Power: Early German Workers’ Party, Munich Putsch, Reorganistion of the Nazi Party, Impact of the Wall St Crash

Growth in support for the Nazi Party

Hitler Becomes Chancellor

Consolidation of Power: Reichstag Fire, Enabing Act, Removal of Opposition, Night of the Long Knives, Death of Hindenburg

Police State: Gestapo, SS, SD

Methods of Propaganda and censorship to achieve control

Extent of Opposition to the Nazi Party: Youth Groups, Religion

Nazi Policies towards women: Traditional views, Marriage, Childbirth

Nazi Policies Towards Young People:  Education, Hitler Youth, League of German Maidens

Nazi Policies on Employment: Reich Labour Service, Invisible Unemployment, German Labour Front

Living Standards in Germany: KDF, Volkswagen, RAD

Persecution of Minorities: Slavs, Homosexuals, Disabled People, Communists

Persecution of Jews: Anti-Semitism, Nuremberg Laws, Kristallnacht

Based on priorities resulting from mock exams.

 

Skills/Concepts

Significance; Perspectives; Causation; Consequence; Diversity; Change and continuity; Chronology; Source Analysis

Civilisation; Government; Society; Culture; Economy; Justice; Beliefs.

Interpretations; Perspectives; Causation; Consequence; Diversity; Change and continuity; Chronology; Source Analysis; Source Evaluation.

Democracy; Government; Society; Culture; Economy; Religion; State; Beliefs; Power.

Interpretations; Perspectives; Causation; Consequence; Diversity; Change and continuity; Chronology; Source Analysis; Source Evaluation.

Democracy; Government; Society; Culture; Economy; Religion; State; Justice; Beliefs; Power.

Significance; Interpretations; Perspectives; Causation; Consequence; Diversity; Change and continuity; Chronology; Source Analysis; Source Evaluation.

Democracy; Government; Society; Culture; Economy; Religion; State; Justice; Beliefs.

 

 

SMSC

Mutual respect and individual liberty.

Tolerance and democracy.

Democracy and individual liberty.

Democracy, tolerance and individual liberty.

 

 

Literacy focus

Explaining and assessing the importance of consequences.

Using political and unfamiliar language.

Writing to evaluate interpretations.

Writing to evaluate interpretations.

 

 

Links to prior learning

The way of life of Plains Indians and the potential conflict that it will create with other cultures

Links to the significance of World War One and the impact of the scale of war

The rise of fascism in the post-World War One era and the reasons for this

How life changed for key groups living under Nazi Rule, e.g. Jews, disabled people, homosexuals

 

 

Preparation for future learning

Students may go on to study aspects of American history at A-Level.

11.3, 11.4 the systems of democracy in Germany during Weimar years is used to explain the rise of the Nazis and their exploitation of the law.

11.4 the methods used to take control inform the extent to which the Nazis were able to control Germany.

Any modern European study at A-Level and Higher Education is informed by the study of this topic.

 

 

Assessment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Explain the importance of the Battle of Little Bighorn (1876) for relations between Plains Indians and the US government. (8)

 

Explain why there were improvements in surgery in the period c1800-present. (12)

Paper One Mock Exam

 

 

Paper Three Mock Exam

Explain why the Nazi Party increased in popularity in the period 1929-33. (12)

 

How far do you agree with Interpretation One about the methods of control used by the Nazi Party? (16)

Paper Two Mock Exam

 

Paper One/Three Mock Exam

GCSE exams.